Transmitted X-Ray Imaging

Micro-XRF systems which use mono-capillary optics can provide additional imaging functionality - transmitted X-Ray imaging. Since the X-Ray micro-beams generated through the mono-capillary optics exhibit near perfect collimation, they retain their narrow diameters and intensity even at large distances from the mono-capillary tip.

Since many samples are partially transparent to X-Rays, a small scintillation detector directly beneath the sample (and aligned with the X-Ray optic) can be used to measure the intensity of X-Rays which pass through the sample.

As the sample is scanned to generate element images, an image of transmitted X-Ray intensity is simultaneously created. The result is similar to typical X-Ray radiographs taken in hospitals, but benefiting from the ultra-high spatial resolution that the micro-XRF systems afford.

It is thus possible to generate detailed images of a sample's physical structure which would ordinarily be invisible to the eye. For example, voids in solder, cracks and phase changes in minerals/rocks, and electronic circuits encased in plastic can all benefit from the transmission X-ray imaging capabilities of micro-XRF systems such as the XGT instruments.

Transmitted X-Ray Imaging