HORIBA Scientific offers a complete line of spectroscopic multi-channel detectors for scientific research. For spectral detection from UV to near-IR, two dimensional CCDs and indium gallium arsenide linear arrays offer a faster acquisition option over single point detectors with relatively high sensitivity. Coupled with HORIBA’s range of aberration corrected, flat field imaging spectrographs, custom spectroscopy packages can be assembled for a variety of applications.

Products

Overview of Available Spectroscopy Cameras

CCDs

Quantum Efficiency by type of CCD

*OE- open electrode, FIUV- front illuminated UV enhanced, FIVS- front illuminated visible, BIUV- back illuminated UV enhanced, BIVS- back illuminated visible, BIDD- back illuminated deep depletion

Selection of all HORIBA Spectroscopy CCD’s

Cooling

Type*

Peak QE

Array Dimension

Pixel Size

Syncerity

TE -60°C

OE
PDF Document Request Quote

58%

1024 x 256

26µm x 26µm

TE -50°C

BI NIR
PDF Document Request Quote

84%

2048 x 70

14µm x 14µm

TE -50°C

BI UV-VIS
PDF Document Request Quote

78%

2048 x 70

14µm x 14µm

SynapsePlus

High Speed CCD

TE -80°C
-95°C with optional external cooling

OE
PDF Document Request Quote

56%

1024 x 256

26µm x 26µm

FIVS
PDF Document Request Quote

47%

2048 x 512

13.5µm x 13.5µm

FIUV
PDF Document Request Quote

48%

2048 x 512

13.5µm x 13.5µm

BIVS
PDF Document Request Quote

95%

1024 x 256
2048 x 512

26µm x 26µm
13.5µm x 13.5µm

BIUV
PDF Document Request Quote

75%

1024 x 256
2048 x 512

26µm x 26µm
13.5µm x 13.5µm

BIDD
PDF Document Request Quote

<90%

1024 x 256

26µm x 26µm

Synapse CCD

TE -75°C
-95°C with optional external cooling

FIVS
PDF Document Request Quote

56%

512 x 512

24µm x 24µm

BIVS
PDF Document Request Quote

95%

512 x 512

24µm x 24µm

BIUV
PDF Document Request Quote

75%

512 x 512

24µm x 24µm

Symphony II CCD

LN2-133°C

OE
PDF Document Request Quote

58%

1024 x 256

26µm x 26µm

FIVS
PDF Document Request Quote

56%

1024 x 256
2048 x 512

26µm x 26µm
13µm x 13µm

FIUV
PDF Document Request Quote

58%

1024 x 256
2048 x 512

26µm x 26µm
13µm x 13µm

BIVS
PDF Document Request Quote

95%

1024 x 256
2048 x 512

26µm x 26µm
13µm x 13µm

BIUV
PDF Document Request Quote

75%

1024 x 256
2048 x 512

26µm x 26µm
13µm x 13µm

BIDD
PDF Document Request Quote

95%

1024 x 256

26µm x 26µm

*OE- open electrode, FIUV- front illuminated UV enhanced, FIVS- front illuminated visible, BIUV- back illuminated UV enhanced, BIVS- back illuminated visible, BIDD- back illuminated deep depletion

EMCCDs

UV-VIS-NIR EMCCDs

Quantum Efficiency by type of EMCCD

*FIUV- front illuminated UV enhanced, FIVS- front illuminated visible, BIUV- back illuminated UV enhanced, BIVS- back illuminated visible, BIDD- back illuminated deep depletion

Selection of Synapse EMCCDs

Cooling

Type*

Peak QE

Array Dimension

Pixel Size

Synapse EMCCD

TE -60°C
-75°C with optional external cooling

FIVS
PDF Document Request Quote

49%

1600 x 200
1600 x 400

16µm x 16µm

FIUV
PDF Document Request Quote

49%

1600 x 200
1600 x 400

16µm x 16µm

BIVS
PDF Document Request Quote

95%

1600 x 200
1600 x 400

16µm x 16µm

BIUV
PDF Document Request Quote

95%

1600 x 200
1600 x 400

16µm x 16µm

BIDD
PDF Document Request Quote

92%

1600 x 200

16µm x 16µm

*OE- open electrode, FIUV- front illuminated UV enhanced, FIVS- front illuminated visible, BIUV- back illuminated UV enhanced, BIVS- back illuminated visible, BIDD- back illuminated deep depletion

InGaAs Arrays

Near-IR InGaAs linear arrays

Quantum Efficiency by Type of InGaAs

Cooling

Wavelength

Array Dimension

Element Size

More Info

Synapse InGaAs

TE -60°C
-75°C with optional
external cooling

800-1650 nm

512 x 1
512 x 1
1024 x 1

25µm x 500µm
50µm x 500µm
25µm x 500µm

PDF Document Request Quote

1050-2100 nm

512 x 1
512 x 1
1024 x 1

25µm x 250µm
50µm x 250µm
25µm x 250µm

Symphony II InGaAs


LN2-103°C

800-1600 nm

512 x 1
512 x 1
1024 x 1

25µm x 500µm
50µm x 500µm
25µm x 500µm



PDF Document Request Quote

1000-2050 nm

512 x 1
512 x 1
1024 x 1

25µm x 250µm
50µm x 250µm
25µm x 250µm

Primary Applications

Spectroscopy cameras are used in conjunction with spectrographs and associated accessories with software to build custom spectroscopy solutions.

Raman Spectroscopy

Raman Spectroscopy

Raman spectroscopy is quickly becoming a popular method for investigating chemical structures and composition. HORIBA Scientific offers full flexibility in designing a component-based Raman detection set-up with choice of iHR spectrometers and Synapse™ or Symphony II CCD and InGaAs detectors. Our systems are best suited for researchers wanting maximum flexibility in implementing their own collection optics, connecting to existing microscopes, or for budget limited researchers needing high sensitivity detection systems that can be expanded and upgraded in the future. HORIBA Scientific’s specialized Raman Division offers a full line of dedicated and fully characterized Raman spectrometers.

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Absorption / Transmission / Reflectance

Absorption / Transmission / Reflectance Schematic

Absorption, Transmission, and Reflectance spectroscopy techniques are commonly used for determining the properties of materials. The modularity of an HORIBA Scientific spectroscopy system outperforms a traditional UV-VIS spectrophotometer by allowing you to expand your experiment capabilities. The interchangeable automated dual grating turret coupled with our motorized order sorting filter wheel, dual exit ports of the microHR, and a wide variety of light sources and detectors give the flexibility needed to cover all wavelength ranges from 180 nm to 20 microns.

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Fluorescence

Fluorescence Schema

With HORIBA Scientific spectroscopy components, you can design a custom fluorometer using iHR spectrometers as the excitation and emission spectrometers with a choice of excitation sources, sample compartments and detectors from our full line of products and accessories. Complete system control is available through our SynerJY® software. HORIBA Scientific’s specialized Fluorescence Division offers a full line of dedicated, fully characterized spectrofluorometers and both time domain and frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instruments, featuring the world’s most sensitive instruments for research and analytical environments.

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Photoluminescence (PL)

Photoluminescence (PL) Schematic

Photoluminescence is a simple yet powerful technique for characterizing semiconductor materials. An iHR550 equipped with a cooled CCD detector for the range of 400-1000 nm, and a cooled InGaAs detector for the 800-1600 nm range, is an excellent general purpose photoluminescence measurement system. Separate optical configurations can be designed for room temperature PL and low-temperature PL using the same iHR spectrometer. iHR spectrometers provide the flexibility to change experiments and optical configurations to meet your needs.

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Plasma / Emission Analysis

Plasma / Emission Analysis Schematic

Simultaneous recording of spectra at multiple locations in a plasma can provide critical information about spatially varying phenomena. A fiber with multiple inputs can collect light from different points in the plasma and arrange the signals into a line of points at the entrance slit of the spectrograph. Taking advantage of the high resolution of a 1250M monochromator and high sensitivity of the liquid nitrogen cooled Symphony II CCD system, the spatially separated data is collected uniquely on the CCD and represents independent optical emission spectra from different fiber collection points.

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Applications Notes

Click for List

Tutorial

Learn more about how multi-channel detectors are used in spectroscopy:

  • CCD detectors in spectroscopy
  • Wavelength to pixel correlation
  • Image width and array detectors
  • Multi-track spectroscopy
  • Etalon fringing in back illuminated CCDs

CCD Sensor Definitions

There are two main types of CCD sensors; front illuminated (FI) and back illuminated (BI).  In a front illuminated sensor, the incident light must pass through the silicon gate before reaching the active silicon, generally leading to lower quantum efficiency.  Response is typically low in the near-IR and UV, however lumogen coatings may be added to FI sensors to enhance UV response.  To increase quantum efficiency in FI sensors, the polysilicon gate may be etched out to allow the light to pass more easily into the silicon layer. This type of sensor is often referred to as open electrode (OE) or open poly.

With a back illuminated sensor, the incident light strikes the photosensitive silicon layer directly.  The silicon layer is physically thinned leading to higher quantum efficiency, but also causing etalon fringe effects from reflections between the silicon and silicon dioxide layers.  Etaloning is a phenomena that can interfere with some spectroscopy measurements, but may have no interference for other measurements. For more information on etaloning, refer to our tutorial entitled “????”. To suppress etaloning and increase quantum efficiency, a thicker substrate may be applied to BI sensors.  This type of sensor is referred to as back illuminated deep depletion.  The graph below depicts the onset of etaloning in a standard back illuminated chip and a back illuminated deep depletion chip.

Etaloning Graph

Schematics of each type of sensor are shown below with brief bullet points describing each sensor’s advantages and disadvantages.

How to Choose a CCD Camera for Spectroscopy

When choosing a multi-channel detector, there are a number of parameters that must be considered.  The first is wavelength range; different chip types have optimal efficiency in different spectral regions.  For example, UV chips use a lumogen coating to enhance efficiency in the 200-400 nm spectral region, while back illuminated deep depletion chips have high efficiency in the NIR spectral region.  In general, back illuminated chips will offer the highest quantum efficiency in any spectral range, however the type of signal being measured must also be considered.

Is the signal comprised of discrete spectral peaks like those seen in plasma measurements of atomic emission or is the signal broad and largely featureless as in many fluorescence measurements?  The signal could also be a combination of both, for example in Raman measurements where discrete spectral peaks lie over a broad fluorescent background.  For types of experiments that have broad signals or backgrounds in the VIS-NIR spectral region, front illuminated chips are a good choice as they do not suffer from etalon fringing evident in back illuminated chips.

Lastly, how intense is the light being measured?  If the signal is very dim, integration times will necessarily be very long.  In this case, a liquid nitrogen deep cooled camera is the best choice for highest sensitivity.

The table below provides a guideline for choosing the correct detector for your application organized by wavelength range and type of measured signal.  There are other factors involved in choosing a CCD; HORIBA’s talented sales team can provide further guidance.

OE

250 – 950 nm

FIUV

200 – 950 nm

FIVS

350 – 850 nm

BIUV

200 – 950 nm

200 – 600 nm

200 – 600 nm

BIVS

350 – 950 nm

BIDD

350 – 1050 nm

InGaAs

800 – 1700 nm

Ext-InGaAs

900 – 2200 nm

*The wavelength ranges reported in this table indicate the optimal QE spectral ranges. For detailed spectral response, refer to the full quantum efficiency curves.

OE

UV – VIS – NIR

FIUV

UV – VIS

FIVS

VIS

BIUV

UV – VIS

UV – VIS (up to 600 nm)

UV – VIS (up to 600 nm)

BIVS

VIS

VIS (up to 600 nm)

VIS (up to 600 nm)

BIDD

VIS – NIR

VIS – NIR (up to 800 nm)

VIS – NIR (up to 800 nm)

InGaAs

NIR (up to 1700 nm)

Ext-InGaAs

NIR (up to 2200 nm)