Colloids, slurries, pigments, inks

Related Applications

Measuring Organic Pigments with Laser Diffraction
Particle size is a critical physical characteristic of pigments and laser diffraction is the most popular method of particle size analysis for the milling process, allowing close control and optimization of a number of final product performance criteria.
Particle Size Analysis of Gold Nanoparticles
Current research using gold dispersions remains quite active and controlling the size and morphology of the particles is critical. This application note describes a procedure and shows results from a study analyzing NIST RM samples.
Sizing Silica Particles by DLS
Silica particles in sand dune
In this application note, the particle sizes of two different silica dispersions are analyzed to demonstrate the utility of the SZ-100 for both suppliers and users of such materials.
Particle Size Analysis of Inks
Measuring the particle size of ink pigments was typically done using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Laser diffraction can also now be used to measure these pigments due to the state of the art enhancements in the LA-960.
Titanium Oxide Using Laser Diffraction
Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) is a pigment used in paints and many other applications. This application note describes suggested methodologies when analyzing TiO2 on the LA-960 laser diffraction particle size analyzer.
Pigment Particle Size and Hiding Power
Pigment particle size analysis
Pigment size can be readily measured by laser diffraction. This measurement requires less time, training and effort than a color strength measurement and provides useful information for the process engineer.
The non destructive and in-situ identification of different black inks using Raman Spectroscopy
The use of security features, such as luminescent inks, has increased significantly in an attempt to prevent fraud and counterfeiting of materials and goods. Obvious applications of these inks include banknotes, branded goods, drug packaging and food security. Security inks can either show up overtly or be covert, with the latter driving the luminescence further from the visible spectral region into the ultraviolet (UV) and near infrared (NIR) regions. These are regions where light sources are not so common. The use of the luminescence lifetime on top of the wavelength signature adds an extra parameter that can be interrogated.
Time‐resolved luminescence of security inks from the UV to NIR
The use of security features, such as luminescent inks, has increased significantly in an attempt to prevent fraud and counterfeiting of materials and goods.

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