Raman Spectrometer - LabRAM Odyssey

Best-in-class Raman Imaging & High Resolution Spectrometer

Special 50 years anniversary series: true confocal Raman microscope enabling the most detailed images and analyses to be obtained with speed and confidence. Ideally suited for both micro and macro measurements, it offers advanced confocal imaging capabilities in 2D and 3D. With guaranteed high performance and intuitive simplicity, the LabRAM Odyssey™ is the ultimate instrument for Raman spectroscopy, widely used for standard Raman analysis, photoluminescence (PL), tip enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) and other hybrid methods.

Segment: Scientific
Division: Molecular and Microanalysis
Base product
Manufacturing Company: HORIBA France SAS

LabRAM Odyssey basic configuration includes :

•    Silver metallic frame  (50th Anniversary Special Edition, 50 units numeroted)
•    800 mm focal length achromatic spectrometer
•    Open Space Microscope with Koelher illumination in Reflection
•    1 high brightness laser: 532 or 785 nm, 100 mW, TEM00
•    1 Ultra Low Frequency filter: cut-off down to 5 cm-1
•    Duoscan achromatic scanning without moving
•    SWIFT XS ultra-fast imaging down to 750 µs/spectrum
•    FIUV high linearity SynapseEM EMCCD
•    High resolution holographic gratings : 1800 & 3000 g/mm

•    Fast imaging low density gratings: 300 & 600 g/mm
•    XYZ motorized stage with encoders
•    Labspec6 64bits including following LabStore apps:
    -    EasyNavTM navigation and autofocus software
    -    ParticleFinderTM particle analysis software
    -    MVATM built-in Multivariate Analysis
    -    KIA HORIBA edition spectral library
•    SEM and AFM-Raman ready*
•    Lifetime application training support**

* field upgrade to SEM and AFM available
** conditions apply, contact us for more details

Specifications1

Unit

DUV @ 266nm 3000g/mm

VIS @ 532 nm 3000 g/mm

NIR @ 785 nm 1800 g/mm

Spectral Dispersion 

cm-1 / pix

< 0.83

< 0.13

< 0.12

Spatial resolution XY

µm

0.8 / 0.5

74XUVI NA 0.65

0.5 / 0.25

100X NA 0.95

0.8 / 0,5

100X NA 0.95

Confocal depth resolution (typical / best)

µm

 

1.5 / 0.8

100X NA 0.95

2 / 1.5

100X NA 0.95

PhotoLuminescence Spectral range2

nm

220 - 2100 (achromatic, no change of optics required)

High wavenumber cut-off3

cm-1

Up to 30 000

Low wavenumber cut-off3

cm-1

Down to 5

Imaging speed

ms/sp

Down to 0.75

Deep cooled Spectroscopic Multichannel Detector

Front Illuminated UV coated EMCCD

1600 x 200 pixel 16 x16µm² pixel size

Dark Current at -60°C

e-/pixel/s

< 0.002

Dimensions (Width x Depth x Height)

mm

1300 x 1194 x 473

1 Indicative values with 3 typical Raman lasers, other wavelengths available. Due to range of options and configurations of the system, this information is given as a guide to ultimate performance 
Acceptance criteria for a given configuration are available upon request.
2 Standard range with EMCCD is 300-1050nm. Requires optional InGaAs array detector to cover 1050-2100nm range
3 Laser wavelength dependant
Polymorphy in pharmaceuticals by Raman Spectroscopy
Polymorphy in pharmaceuticals by Raman Spectroscopy
Raman Spectroscopy Applied to the Lithium-ion Battery Analysis
Raman Spectroscopy Applied to the Lithium-ion Battery Analysis
The application note explains how the Raman Spectroscopy can be helpful in the analysis of cathodes and anodes in Li-ion batteries. Today’s state of art of technology requires more reliable, more efficient and powerful energy sources. Lithium-ion batteries are thus of high interest. Raman spectroscopy adapts to the different stages of life of these batteries, such as the characterization of new materials for more flexible systems, failure analysis; but also more standard analysis of used material during charge/discharge process, including structural and electronic properties, and even robust, automated QC tests.
Raman Analysis of Single Bacteria Cells
Raman Analysis of Single Bacteria Cells
Raman Investigation of Micro-organisms on a single cell level
Raman Investigation of Micro-organisms on a single cell level
Raman Imaging of monkey brain tissue
Raman Imaging of monkey brain tissue
Raman and Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Enzymes
Raman and Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Enzymes
The TRIAX and iHR series spectrometers used in Raman system configurations provide superior imaging performance with no re-diffracted light and maximized optical throughput. Coupled to a high-performance Symphony® or Synapse™ CCD detector, these systems provide a high-performance spectroscopy platform for the investigation of chemical structures and components.
Raman microscopy in Pharmaceuticals salt analysis
Raman microscopy in Pharmaceuticals salt analysis
Raman Analysis and characterization of pharmaceuticals
Raman Analysis and characterization of pharmaceuticals
In Vivo Raman measurements of Human Skin
In Vivo Raman measurements of Human Skin
Characterization and mapping of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients in a tablet using Raman and IR spectroscopy
Characterization and mapping of active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients in a tablet using Raman and IR spectroscopy
Coloured Diamond Defect Idenditication by Raman Diffusion and Photoluminescence
Coloured Diamond Defect Idenditication by Raman Diffusion and Photoluminescence
The colour enhancement treatment on native brown and yellow diamonds can be highlighted by Photo Luminescence analyses performed with the Raman spectrometer LabRAM HR. The PL signature of green and violet diamonds has also been recorded. The defect centres responsible of the colour of the diamonds have all been detected and assigned. This proves the Raman spectrometer to be a very good tool to investigate the fine defects in the Diamond structure by Photoluminescence analysis.
Graphene Studies using Raman Spectroscopy
Graphene Studies using Raman Spectroscopy
Graphene is a new nanomaterial which may partially replace silicon in microcircuits and computer chips in the future. In order to better understand its quality characteristics, fast reliable techniques that deliver the right property measures are needed. Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a key technique for studying this exceptional material.
Derivation of Physical Parameters from Raman Spectra of Hard Carbon Films
Derivation of Physical Parameters from Raman Spectra of Hard Carbon Films
The Raman spectra of elemental carbon materials are known to be sensitive to polymorphy. For hard carbon films, the spectra of amorphous and diamond-like carbons can be band-fit to separate the contributions of the "graphitic carbon" (G band) from the "disordered carbon" (D band). The spectral behaviour of carbon films has been empirically correlated with thin film physical properties such as hardness, durability, optical transparency, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance, and can be of use for prediction of these properties without extensive alternative testing. The DiskRam has been designed to automate the collection of Raman spectra from hard carbon coatings on computer hard disk media and the extraction of parameters that are well correlated with the properties of the films. The extracted information is output in spreadsheet format for SPC at a manufacturing facility.
SWNT Quality Control by Raman Spectroscopy
SWNT Quality Control by Raman Spectroscopy
Raman has shown a high potential in characterising the SWCNTs' structure. The correlation between knowledge about structure with physical and chemical properties about the tubes make the technique extremely powerful to control the quality of the SWCNTs for specific applications. Raman spectrometer capabilities like spatial resolution, spectral resolution and excitation wavelength versatility have been examined. Beside Raman, preliminary fluorescence studies are describing the potential of the technique.
Impact of Raman Spectroscopy on Technologically Important Forms of Elemental Carbon
Impact of Raman Spectroscopy on Technologically Important Forms of Elemental Carbon
The Raman spectra of the various forms of elemental carbon are very sensitive to the type of nearest neighbour bonding, and to intermediate and long range order. In many cases Raman spectroscopy is the technique of choice for characterization of carbon materials. Correlation of Raman spectral features with tribological properties can facilitate the deposition of carbon films.
Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Using Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (TERS)
Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Using Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (TERS)
The use of TERS to reveal the defects density in the structure of CNTs is of interest for a better understanding of the electrical properties of the devices made with such nano-objects. Not only defects concentration but also local chirality changes from the different radial breathing modes, pressure effect and strain distribution can be studied at the single carbon nanotube level through TERS.
Raman and PL Characterization of GaN
Raman and PL Characterization of GaN
Gallium Nitride (GaN) is one of a generation of promising light-emitting materials. Its direct energy band gap of ~3.4 eV at room temperature make it particularly suitable for emission in the blue, and near UV spectral ranges. The material often exhibits high temperature stability and low electrical leakage, and hence GaN is generally a good candidate for fabricating high-temperature and high-power devices.
Combined Raman and Photoluminescence Imaging of 2D WS2
Combined Raman and Photoluminescence Imaging of 2D WS2
Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy reveal different aspects of the solid state structure of 2D materials. Raman and photoluminescence imaging performed simultaneously with one instrument reveals the spatial variation of the solid state structure and electronic properties of 2D crystals that is not revealed in reflected white light imaging. That ability should allow materials scientists to better design and fabricate electronic and optoelectronic devices based upon 2D crystals.
Number of Layers of MoS2 Determined Using Raman Spectroscopy
Number of Layers of MoS2 Determined Using Raman Spectroscopy
The two methods - Analysis of fingerprint modes (intralayer) and Analysis of low-frequency modes (interlayer) - give complementary results and allow the determination of the number of MoS2 layers. Method 2 (using low frequency modes) gives excellent contrast; however it does not show single layer regions (which is related to the nature of the modes, rising from interaction between at least two layers). Method 1 (using fingerprint modes) shows all the layers, but the contrast is poorer, particularly for higher numbers of layers. The best result can be obtained combining the two methods. All the measurements (low-frequency and fingerprint) were done using ultra-low frequency ULFTM filters which allow a high throughput measurement in a full Raman range, down to <10 cm-1.
Raman Imaging of Holographic Gratings Inscribed on Polymer Thin Films
Raman Imaging of Holographic Gratings Inscribed on Polymer Thin Films
Using holographic techniques we have structured the surface in a one step procedure (no wet nor photocuring processing ) along the X and Y directions. A grating is first inscribed with grooves along the X direction, the sample is rotated by 90° and a second grating is inscribed with grooves along the Y direction. The intensity of the 1st diffracted orders is monitored to have equal intensities in both X and Y directions.
Raman Characterization of Polymers in Industrial Applications
Raman Characterization of Polymers in Industrial Applications
Recent developments in Raman instrumentation have made the technique easier to use, more compact, and more affordable. Consequently, all of the demonstrated potential of the spectroscopy for industrial uses can now be exploited, including its use in combination with statistical methods for concentration calibrations.
Localisation of Polymeric Phases by Raman Microscopy Mapping Components of a Blend in a Plane and Depth Profiles of Laminated Film
Localisation of Polymeric Phases by Raman Microscopy Mapping Components of a Blend in a Plane and Depth Profiles of Laminated Film
Blending, an alternative method for engineering products that combines the properties of polymer types is a physical mixing. It has the advantage of being not only simple and inexpensive, but also allows for re-cycling used material. Incompatibility or non-miscibility of the differing chemical components is often an issue in the final performance of the polymer product. The first part of this note concerns the dispersion of the two components in a polyethylene-polybutylene terephthalate blend. The chemical imaging capabilities of the LabRAM are used to get this information. The second part deals with the depth analysis of laminated films made of different polymer layers.
Using Chemometrics and Raman Spectra for Quantitative Predictions of Physical and Chemical Properties of Polymers
Using Chemometrics and Raman Spectra for Quantitative Predictions of Physical and Chemical Properties of Polymers
As far as polymeric fibres are concerned, slight modifications of Raman features are directly related to differences in the molecular orientation and the degree of crystallinity of the fibres. To utilize these subtle spectral changes and correlate them with physical properties of the polymer, one is obliged to use Chemometrics on the Raman spectra. The resulting synergism between Raman spectroscopy and Chemometrics will provide a powerful tool for monitoring and control of manufacturing of polymeric materials.
Transmission Raman Spectroscopy: Review of Applications
Transmission Raman Spectroscopy: Review of Applications
The transmission design has demonstrated to be the technique of choice whenever Raman spectral information of a bulk material is required. It has already proven its utility for pharmaceutical applications, as tablets or even powder mixtures are good candidates for this measurement mode. However, transmission Raman might be applied successfully to other sample types, such as polymers, bio-tissues or any translucent material, and can be envisaged for evaluating the content of product inside a package. In addition, as TRS provides a global spectral information of the measured sample, it will be a technique of choice when quantitative evaluation of mixtures is needed.
Real-time Monitoring of Polymerisations in Emulsions by Raman Spectroscopy - Modelling and Chemometrics
Real-time Monitoring of Polymerisations in Emulsions by Raman Spectroscopy - Modelling and Chemometrics
Raman spectra, in conjunction with Multivariate (Chemometric) Analysis, have been demonstrated to provide real-time information on the progress of a polymerisation reaction. As shown by this example, these results can provide unexpected information on the details of the reaction. in this case, the inequivalent reaction rates of the two monomers. Such information ultimately enables the process engineer to optimise his process.
What’s Protecting Your Mobile Screen? A Depth Profile of Polymer Protection Covers Using Raman and UFS-GDOES
What’s Protecting Your Mobile Screen? A Depth Profile of Polymer Protection Covers Using Raman and UFS-GDOES
Pulsed RF Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometry, coupled with the Ultra Fast Sputtering system, offers the Ultra Fast Elemental Depth Profiling of plastic thin films Polymer Mobile Screen Protection Covers. By coupling this technique with the Raman spectroscopy z-Scan analysis it is possible to acquire important information concerning the fabrication of smartphone screen protectors.
Confocal Raman microspectrometry imaging combined with chemometric methods
Confocal Raman microspectrometry imaging combined with chemometric methods
The non destructive and in-situ identification of different black inks using Raman Spectroscopy
The non destructive and in-situ identification of different black inks using Raman Spectroscopy
Raman Analysis of laser-processed glass materials
Raman Analysis of laser-processed glass materials
Raman Imaging of a Single Gallium Nitride Nanowire: Pushing the Limits of Confocal Microscopy
Raman Imaging of a Single Gallium Nitride Nanowire: Pushing the Limits of Confocal Microscopy
We have performed a complete Raman polarized study of a single GaN nanowire using a confocal microscope together with a high resolution stage. The high spatial resolution of our Raman confocal instrument together with a piezoelectric stage demonstrates unambiguously the possibility to image the optical properties of nano-objects with a resolution better than 200 nm keeping the fill advantage of the polarization control under a confocal microscope.
Identification of airborne pollen by Raman spectroscopy
Identification of airborne pollen by Raman spectroscopy
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