Horiba Develops an Ultra-High-Sensitivity Biosensor with Zoom, Using a Chemical CCD

1 November 2001


Horiba, Ltd., together with Bio Applied Systems Inc. (president: Katsuhiko Tomita; headquarters located in Kyoto), a Horiba subsidiary and a developer of measurement devices for use in bio-related fields, has developed an ultra-high-sensitivity biosensor using a chemical CCD. The new device is capable of increasing its sensitivity to the density level designated for each substance measured. The basic principle of chemical CCD imaging that is used for this product was co-developed by Dr. Kazuaki Sawada, associate professor of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology. This principle can be applied for environmental, medical, or physical purposes, such as those relating to environmental hormones and genetic diagnoses.

The new sensor measures the amount of electricity stored in the sensor according to the density of the substance measured. Through the principle of capacity increase, the amount of electricity (electrons) can be inspected with high sensitivity by arbitrarily increasing the signal outputs necessary for measurement. The sensor requires no outer zooming device. The sensor also can measure at levels of accuracy up to 1/100,000th of a pH unit. This sensitivity is more than 100 times as high as that of past pH meters. The sensor monitors signals of bisphenol-A, supposedly one of the environmental hormones, thereby succeeding in nanogram-level inspection. Horiba will apply this measurement technology to bio-related fields while making efforts to achieve higher sensitivity through the further improvements of antibody reactions with substances measured, membranes, and electric circuits.

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About Dr. Sawada, associate professor of Toyohashi University of Technology
Dr. Sawada has been working to realize high-performance ICs, quantum devices, intelligent sensors, and more. He conducts research primarily on new materials and structures, device processing, sensor devices, and ICs.
Contact:
Dr. Kazuaki Sawada
Toyohashi University of Technology
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 Japan
Telephone & fax: +81-532-44-6739 (direct)