What are the most common applications of Raman spectroscopy?

Raman spectroscopy is used in many varied fields – in fact, any application where non-destructive, microscopic, chemical analysis and imaging is required.  Whether the goal is qualitative or quantitative data, Raman analysis can provide key information easily and quickly.  It can be used to rapidly characterise the chemical composition and structure of a sample, whether solid, liquid, gas, gel, slurry or powder.

The discussion below highlights some key areas where the use of Raman is well established, and its value greatly appreciated.  For more detail, and information about other uses of Raman please see our Raman applications section.

 


Raman spectral image of pharmaceutical tablet, showing distribution of four major components
Raman spectral image of pharmaceutical tablet, showing distribution of four major components
  • Compound distribution in tablets
  • Blend uniformity
  • High throughput screening
  • API concentration
  • Powder content and purity
  • Raw material verification
  • Polymorphic forms
  • Crystallinity
  • Contaminant identification
  • Combinatorial chemistry
  • In vivo analysis and skin depth profiling

 


Raman spectra of (top to bottom) olivine, apatite, garnet and gypsum illustrating how Raman can be used for fast mineral ID.
Raman spectra of (top to bottom) olivine, apatite, garnet and gypsum illustrating how Raman can be used for fast mineral ID.
  • Gemstone and mineral identification
  • Fluid inclusions
  • Mineral and phase distribution in rock sections
  • Phase transitions
  • Mineral behaviour under extreme conditions

 


Peak fitting of the D and G bands in a DLC spectrum
Peak fitting of the D and G bands in a DLC spectrum
  • Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)
  • Purity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)
  • Electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)
  • sp2 and sp3 structure in carbon materials
  • Hard disk drives
  • Diamond like carbon (DLC) coating properties
  • Defect/disorder analysis in carbon materials
  • Diamond quality and provenance

 


Photoluminescence image of a 3” MQW semiconductor wafer, showing variation of emission peak width
Photoluminescence image of a 3” MQW semiconductor wafer, showing variation of emission peak width
  • Characterisation of intrinsic stress/strain
  • Purity
  • Alloy composition
  • Contamination identification
  • Superlattice structure
  • Defect analysis
  • Hetero-structures
  • Doping effects
  • Photoluminescence micro-analysis

 


Multivariate clustering of spectra acquired from three bacterial species, illustrating how Raman can be used to characterise and distinguish bacteria at the single cell level.
Multivariate clustering of spectra acquired from three bacterial species, illustrating how Raman can be used to characterise and distinguish bacteria at the single cell level.
  • Bio-compatibility
  • DNA/RNA analysis
  • Drug/cell interactions
  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT)
  • Metabolic accretions
  • Disease diagnosis
  • Single cell analysis
  • Cell sorting
  • Characterisation of bio-molecules
  • Bone structure

 

 

Back to FAQs